Playing with words (part II)

Explicit, planned, and strategic strategies for teaching vocabulary are at the core of the Primary English approach to teaching vocabulary. If you attend one of our vocabulary training sessions, we’ll walk you through the available research on vocabulary acquisition and provide you with a taste of some practical approaches for actively teaching vocabulary as part of your core English provision. This is the Primary English way; we’re practical, strategic and ultimately very sensible.

This said, we do like to have a bit of fun, and incidental learning is one of the ways we like to do this. On our vocabulary training courses, Taboo is one way we catch our attendees learning. If you’ve never played Taboo, it’s a fun game for activating known vocabulary by restricting players’ word choices by making designated words ‘Taboo’. So with the card below, players try to guess the word ‘sailor’ from their colleagues’ given clues (these may not include, ship, sea, captain or ocean). What we’ve found from playing this game, is that good knowledge of synonyms is useful; you can’t say ship but you can say ‘someone who works on a boat’. We’ve also found that activating understanding of the context of the word by saying ‘this is someone who navigates on a boat’ should prove to be a useful clue. And knowing that some of these people are called a ‘mate’ is a useful bit of general knowledge about the target word. So, as you can see, Taboo is a great incidental activity for practising and provoking existing vocabulary. Download our Taboo cards free of charge from our resources page.

Taboo
Taboo

Another popular incidental learning activity used on our training courses is Four Pictures One Word. You may well have played this on your phone or tablet, and if like me, you’ll have found it incredibly addictive. Here’s an example we use in training. All four pictures show the same word used in different contexts. The black dashes indicate the number of letters in the word, and the necessary letters are provided (along with a few extras to keep you guessing).

Four pictures one word

This game is perfect for morning work and for filling one of those micro-gaps that sometimes appear in the school day. I’m hoping by now that you’ve worked out the missing word. If you look closely, you’ll see one boy indicating that it was his little brother that ‘did it’, in the next you’ll identify the indicator of a car, you’ll then see an image of a car indicating to pull onto the road, and in the final image some pH/ litmus paper is being used to indicate the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. The missing word is of course, indicate. What I really love about this activity is how it demonstrates that the same word can be used in different contexts and that rigid definitions can limit our understanding of words.

As I said at the beginning of this article, Primary English is an organisation that focuses on planned, strategic approaches to vocabulary learning. However, this doesn’t stop us from spotting an opportunity to have a bit of fun by finding incidental opportunities to play with words.  

If you you’re looking for a playful approach to word learning, you may be interested in these posts:

Riddle with vocabulary

Very punny vocabulary

Rachel Clarke

Director and owner – Primary English Education Consultancy Limited

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